How to Create Very Important Learning Experiences

Adult learner creates learning experience

How to Create Very Important Learning Experiences

What is your commitment to creating learning experiences for yourself?

I asked because I want to share with you my experience in this area.

Over the years, I have been fortunate enough to spend time with entrepreneurs and highly successful people. From Peter Lowe’s events in the 90s to Dan Kennedy’s and Tony Robbins’ seminars in the 2000s, I was out there learning from the best.

And that was by my choice.

In fact, I could go back even further to my college days when I listened to cassette tapes nonstop in my car. And during those times, I was constantly challenged to think about my business and learn new tricks to improve it.

To this day, that challenge has never stopped.

My mind is always on my personal and business plans particularly about how to go forward. In the process, I’ve even spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to soak up all the knowledge I could.

Sometimes, I walk out of an event feeling like I took a drink with a firehose. I got more clarity and I always leave those learning experiences thinking huge.

Such experiences ultimately helped me accomplish the success that I have today.

My goal with this article is to give you the three tips for you to create your own learning experiences. These will help you in your real estate journey and even in life.

The Three Tips
Tip #1 – Create Learning Experiences Away From Your Working Environment

I believe it’s super-valuable create a learning experience while physically away from your work environment.

It’s the reason why I spent a whole day with Joe Vitale, a well-known spiritual teacher and author. I reached out to Joe over the past year or so, and he gave me a chance to learn from him.

I deliberately immerse myself in those environments, and I believe you should do the same.

But if that’s not possible, know that books are also a great instrument for creating learning experiences outside your work environment.

I remember not that long ago, I was on the way back from a nice relaxing trip to Bermuda. The book I had with me at that time was The Lessons and Legacy of President John F. Kennedy on Leadership by Johnny Barnes. And I thoroughly enjoyed reading it.

Now, I don’t care about your political leaning. That doesn’t matter because the book itself is excellent and shows you the importance of self-learning and self-teaching.

To stress my point, let me share with you the JFK quote the writer used to start chapter seven:

“There’s no school for presidents, either. We’re going to learn this together.”

JFK said that to Robert McNamara, who, at the time, didn’t feel qualified to be the defense secretary.

It’s a pretty major thing for JFK to say, and I completely agree with him. After all, my wife Kim and I participated in businesses that had nothing to do with what we went to school for.

Don’t get me wrong, though. Going to college gives you the tools and bandwidth to succeed in a particular industry. But you want to avoid getting bogged down by the diplomas and details of your formal education.

This brings me to the next tip…

Tip #2 – New Information is Only as Good as the Use You Have For It

As a general rule, you can never learn too much about your particular line of work. And that starts to kick in after college.

But keep in mind that information skills are only as good as how you put them to use.

With that said, allow me to reference the JFK book again here.

You see, JFK wasn’t afraid to use new information to change his mind about one issue or learn new skills to help him do his job (honestly, I hate calling that a job).

JFK was the President of the United States, but he continuously challenged himself with never-ending improvement.

And that idea ties into Robbins’s comment about never-ending improvement.

To paraphrase what Robbins said, what’s essential to success is learning new facts and immersing yourself with others that do the same thing. Then, you want to take a step back and see if your assumptions are correct.

Keep that in mind and repeat the process to get the most out of each of your learning experiences.

Tip #3 – Jumpstart Your Day

When you get up in the morning, there are nine things you can do to jumpstart your day and create the learning experiences we’re discussing here. Here’s what these are:

  1. Meditate and visualize – you can meditate before you go to bed or right after you wake up. It’s okay to meditate in any way you find suitable. In my case, I’m currently using an app to help me stay on track.
  2. Work out or practice yoga – this creates discipline and gives you an energy boost while lowering your stress.
  3. Review your life plan – it takes three to five minutes every day to review your business plans and goals.
  4. Read something inspirational or motivational – reading keeps you focused, and that’s why I read even when I’m on one of the machines at the gym.
  5. Listen to something motivational – again, it keeps you focused, and you can do it simultaneously with other activities.
  6. Do affirmations out loud – you can take this to the next level and make a recording of your own affirmations.
  7. Go to lunch at the same time every day and eat something to give you energy in the afternoon.
  8. When you wake up, visualize starting each day as if you’re unemployed and evoke that sense of income generation.
  9. Set your expectations – think about your expectations and minimum standards and write them down, if you haven’t already.

Grow Through Continuous Learning

To keep scaling your real estate business and grow personally and professionally, you need to keep learning. It’s a never-ending process.

Yes, that takes some discipline and effort. But once it gets into your blood, you’ll keep finding new ways to develop your knowledge and mindset.

This article has given you three tips on how you can create your learning experiences and take full advantage of them. Now, it’s time to take action.

And if you wish to further boost your success, apply for our Quantum Leap System Home Study Program.